Coordinators:

Gema García-Albacete is Associate Professor in Political Science at the Universidad Carlos III in Madrid, Department of Social Sciences, and a Fellow at the Carlos III – Juan March Institute. She is currently Deputy of the Head of Department for Political Science and Co-director of the Master Program: “Máster Universitario en Análisis Político y Electoral”. She received her PhD from the University of Mannheim, where she also worked as a lecturer at the Chair of Political Science and International Comparative Research. Before working at UC3M she was a Juan de la Cierva postdoctoral researcher at the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid.

Her research relates to citizens’ political attitudes and behaviour with an emphasis on gender and age-based inequalities. She has recently worked in other sources of inequalities such as origin. In general, she is interested in the processes by which political participation and political orientations develop, as well as how contextual and individual determinants interact in these processes. I am also interested in the use of diverse research methodologies and techniques to develop this research field further. Parts of my research have appeared in West European Politics, the International Journal of Press/Politics, the International Journal of Public Opinion Research or in the monograph Young People’s Political Participation in Western Europe by Palgrave Macmillan.


Mónica Ferrín Pereira is Intalent and Ramón y Cajal researcher at the Faculty of Sociology, University of A Coruña. She received her PhD in Social and Political Sciences from the European University Institute (EUI) in Italy. Before moving to A Coruña, she worked at Collegio Carlo Alberto in Turin, and at the University of Zürich.

Her research focuses on citizens’ democratic attitudes and gender inequality in public involvement. She is the sponsor of the European Social Survey Round 6 module on ‘Europeans’ understandings and evaluations of democracy’, which will be fielded again in 2021. She is also interested in understanding the gender gap in public participation, with a strong focus on stereotyping. Her research has appeared in the European Journal of Political Research, West European Politics, or the International Journal of Press/Politics.


Marta Fraile is permanent Research Fellow at Spanish Scientific Research Institute, CSIC (Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas), working at the Institute of Public Goods and Policies (IPP).  She holds a PhD’s in Social and Political Sciences from the European University Institute (EUI) in Florence (Italy). She has held teaching and research positions at Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Juan March Institute (CEACS, Madrid), Scuola Superiore Sant’ Anna (Pisa), Central European University (Budapest), and Europen University Institute (EUI).

Her research spans across the fields of public opinion, media effects, political participation and specially, gender & politics. She is currently doing research about the different obstacles women find when getting involved in the political realm with a special focus on the psychological traits that are the products of gendered socialization processes. She is also doing research on public opinion on gender inequality and gender identities in Europe from a comparative perspective.

Her work has appeared in journals such as British Journal of Political Science, European Journal of Political Research, European Union Politics, the International Journal of Press/Politics , International Political Science Review, Political Psychology, Politics and Gender, Political Research Quarterly, Political Studies, Social Policy, West European Politics, among others.

Team members:

Irene Sánchez-Vítores is a Juan de la Cierva postdoctoral researcher at the Universidad Carlos III in Madrid, Department of Social Sciences. Previously, she received her PhD from the Department of Political and Social Sciences at the European University Institute (Florence, Italy). Her research relates to political orientations and behaviour, with an emphasis on gender inequalities and the multidimensionality of political interest. More generally, she is interested in the process of formation of political orientation and how life-cycle events and learning shape political inequalities. She is also interested in the methodological implications of this research and how it can be applied to better understand citizens’ attitudes. My research has been published in the Revista Española de Investigaciones Sociológicas, Social Politics or Political Psychology.


Javier Lorente Fontaneda (PhD Political Science, University Autónoma de Madrid 2017) is Assistant Professor in the Department of Public Law I and Political Science at the University Rey Juan Carlos. He works in the field of Political Behaviour, focusing on young people’s relationship with politics, the development of political attitudes and the formation of political generations. More specifically he has done research on the impact of the economic crisis on youth’s political attitudes and studied how political generations can provide insights to the acquisition of citizens’ political ideology. He has participated in several edited volumes, published in national and international journals (such as the Spanish Journal of Sociological Research, the International Journal of Sociology and the European Journal of Higher Education) and written a book about the left-right ideology and political generations.


Clara Pacheco Romero received her bachelor’s degree in Political Science and Sociology, and her master’s degree in Political and Electoral Analysis from the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, with an excellent academic record supported by regional and university level awards. In general, she is interested in the study of political behaviour and public opinion. As a research assistant in GENPOL, she is contributing to the revision of questionnaires and experimental designs, to the analysis of biases in the results, as well as to the coding of information and the development of the codebook from qualitative interviews.